Displaying 46-60 of 110

Peter O. Gray

Peter Gray was a full-time professor of psychology at Boston College for 30 years, where he served his department at various times as Department Chair, Undergraduate Program Director, and Graduate Program Director.  He has published research in biological, evolutionary, cultural, developmental and educational psychology; published articles on innovative teaching methods; taught more than 20 different undergraduate courses, including, most regularly, introductory psychology; helped develop a university-wide program to improve students' study and learning skills; and developed a program of research practicum courses. He is now retired from regular teaching, but maintains a position as Research Professor at Boston College.  Most of his current research and writing has to do with the value of play, especially free age-mixed play, in children's development.  He is author of a popular weekly blog entitled Freedom to Learn: The Roles of Play and Curiosity as Foundations for Learning.

Before joining Boston College, Peter Gray studied psychology as an undergraduate at Columbia University and earned a Ph.D. in biological sciences at Rockefeller University.  He earned his way through college by coaching basketball and working with youth groups in New York City.  As a graduate student he directed a summer biology program for talented high school students from impoverished neighborhoods.  His avocations today include long distance bicycling, kayaking, and backwoods skiing.


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Jeff Greenberg

Jeff Greenberg is a Professor of Psychology and College of Science Fellow at the University of Arizona. As a small child growing up in the Bronx, he was very curious about the human propensities for vanity and prejudice. Jeff majored in psychology at the University of Pennsylvania, but it wasn’t until his final semester, and his first course in social psychology, that he found a field where people where asking the questions he thought should be asked. Soon after starting a master’s program in social psychology at Southern Methodist University, he knew this was what he wanted to spend his life studying and teaching. After receiving his M.A., Jeff completed his Ph.D. at University of Kansas in 1982 under the mentorship of Jack Brehm. He has since received numerous research and teaching awards. His research has contributed to understanding self-serving biases, how motivation affects cognition, the effects of ethnic slurs, the role of self-awareness in depression, cognitive dissonance, and how concerns about death contribute to prejudice, self-esteem striving, and many other aspects of social behavior. Jeff has also co-authored or co-edited six prior books, including the Handbook of Experimental Existential Psychology and In the Wake of 9/11: The Psychology of Terror.


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Richard A. Griggs

Richard A. Griggs is Professor Emeritus of Psychology at the University of Florida. After earning his Ph.D. in cognitive psychology at Indiana University, he went to the University of Florida, where he has spent his entire academic career. He has won numerous teaching awards at the University of Florida and was named APA's Society for the Teaching of Psychology Teacher of the Year for 4-year Colleges and Universities in 1994. He served on the Editorial Board of Teaching of Psychology for over a decade, as a Contemporary Psychology Consulting Editor for textbook reviews, and as an Associate Editor of Thinking and Reasoning. His two main research areas are human reasoning and the teaching of psychology. He has published over 150 journal articles, reviews, and book chapters, including 48 in Teaching of Psychology. He was also one of the originators and developers of the Society for the Teaching of Psychology's online resource, A Compendium of Introductory Psychology Textbooks, the editor of Volume 3 of the Society's Handbook for Teaching Introductory Psychology, and the coeditor of the Society's Teaching Introductory Psychology: Tips from ToP and Teaching Statistics and Research Methods: Tips from ToP. When he isn't busy with professional activities, he likes to relax at home with wife Sherri, also a psychologist, and their dog, Lucy. His main pasttimes are reading, puzzles, exercise and golf.


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Diana Hacker

Diana Hacker personally class-tested her handbooks with nearly four thousand students over thirty-five years at Prince George’s Community College in Maryland, where she was a member of the English faculty. Hacker handbooks, built on innovation and on a keen understanding of the challenges facing student writers, are the most widely adopted in America. Hacker handbooks, all published by Bedford/St. Martin’s, include A Writer’s Reference, Ninth Edition (2018); A Pocket Style Manual, Eighth Edition (2018); The Bedford Handbook, Tenth Edition (2017); Rules for Writers, Eighth Edition (2016); and Writer’s Help 2.0, Hacker Version.


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Jane S. Halonen

Jane S. Halonen has been a Professor of Psychology at the University of West Florida for over a decade.  She has been fortunate also to have great professional families at James Madison University and Alverno College where she was lucky enough to cross paths with the talented Cynthia Gray.  Jane’s most recent research emphases have been on helping good departments become great ones as well as trying to help legislators understand the true nature of psychology in tough economic times.  Jane has been involved over the course of her career with helping the American Psychological Association develop guidelines or standards of academic performance from high school through graduate levels of education.  In 2000, she won the Distinguished Teaching Award winner by the American Psychological Foundation and the American Psychological Association named her an “Eminent Woman in Psychology” in 2003.  She served as the Chief Reader for the Psychology Advanced Placement Reading from 2004-2009.  A self-identified “teaching conference junkie,” Jane served on the NITOP Board and has presented at nearly every regional teaching conference in psychology.  With Peter Seldin, she also co-directed the International Conference on Improving University Teaching from 2001-2008.


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Jane S. Halonen

Jane S. Halonen has been a Professor Psychology at the University of West Florida for over a decade.  She has been fortunate also to have great professional families at James Madison University and Alverno College where she was lucky enough to cross paths with the talented Cynthia Gray.  Jane’s research most recent research emphases have been on helping good departments become great ones as well as trying to help legislators understand the true nature of psychology in tough economic times.  Jane has been involved over the course of her career with helping the American Psychological Association develop guidelines or standards of academic performance from high school through graduate levels of education.  In 2000, she won the Distinguished Teaching Award winner by the American Psychological Foundation and the American Psychological Association named her an “Eminent Woman in Psychology” in 2003.  She served as the Chief Reader for the Psychology Advanced Placement Reading from 2004-2009.  A self-identified “teaching conference junkie,” Jane served on the NITOP Board and has presented at nearly every regional teaching conference in psychology.  With Peter Seldin, she also co-directed the International Conference on Improving University Teaching from 2001-2008.


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Thomas Heinzen

Tom Heinzen is Professor of Psychology at William Paterson University of New Jersey. A graduate of Rockford College, he earned his Ph.D. in social psychology at the State University of New York at Albany. After publishing his first book on frustration  and creativity in government, Heinzen worked as a public policy research associate, consulted for the Johns Hopkins Center for Talented Youth, and then began his teaching career. He founded William Paterson University’s Psychology Club, established an undergraduate research conference, and has been awarded various teaching honors while continuing to write articles, books, and plays that support the teaching of general psychology and statistics. Heinzen, a fellow of the Eastern Psychological Association, is also the editor of Many Things to Tell You, a volume of poetry by elderly writers. His current  research involves applying game design to higher education.


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Don H. Hockenbury

Don H. Hockenbury is Associate Professor of Psychology at Tulsa Community College, where he has had the privilege of teaching undergraduates for more than 30 years. Although he enjoys the unique challenges of teaching online, the classroom remains Don’s favorite forum for teaching students about the science and personal relevance of psychology. He is a recipient of the Tulsa Community College Award for Teaching Excellence. Don’s educational background includes a B.S. in psychology and an M.A. in clinical psychology, both from the University of Tulsa. Before he began his teaching career, he worked in psychiatric facilities and in private practice.

Don’s favorite research interests include the scientific study of sleep and dreaming, biopsychology, memory, psychological disorders, and the history of psychology. Don belongs to several professional organizations, including the Association of Psychological Science (APS), the American Psychological Association (APA), the American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM), and the Sleep Research Society (SRS).


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Sandra E. Hockenbury

Sandra E. Hockenbury is a science writer who specializes in psychology. Sandy received her B.A. from Shimer College and her M.A. from the University of Chicago, where she was also a research associate at the Institute of Social and Behavioral Pathology. Prior to co-authoring Psychology and Discovering Psychology, Sandy worked for several years as a psychology editor in both academic and college textbook publishing. Sandy has also taught as an adjunct faculty member at Tulsa Community College.

Sandy’s areas of interest include positive psychology, cross-cultural psychology, and the intersection of Buddhist philosophy, neuroscience, and psychology. She is a member of the American Psychological Association (APA), the Association of Psychological Science (APS), and the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). Sandy is a member of the Board of Trustees of Shimer College and recently served as a volunteer with Nomads Clinic, a nonprofit organization that brings medical care to remote areas in the Himalayan regions of Nepal and the Tibetan Plateau.

Don and Sandy’s daughter, Laura, is a college senior and geology major who, like her parents, has wide-ranging interests, including climate change, sustainable development, psychology, and the arts. A classical and improvisational pianist, co-director of her college comedy sketch group, and enthusiastic member of the 2011 Division III Ultimate college women’s championship team, Laura has recently taken up the mandolin.


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Misty Hull

Misty Hull is a professor of psychology at Pikes Peak Community College in Colorado Springs, Colorado. She has taught a range of psychology courses at Pikes Peak Community College, including introductory psychology, human sexuality, and social psychology in a variety of delivery formats (traditional, online, and hybrid). Her love of teaching comes through in her dedication to mentoring new and part-time faculty in the teaching of psychology. She received her BS in human development and family studies from Texas Tech University in Lubbock, Texas, and an MA in professional counseling at Colorado Christian University in Lakewood, Colorado. She has served in a variety of administrative roles at Pikes Peak Community College, including interim associate dean, and coordinator of the Student Crisis Counseling Office. In addition, she has helped to facilitate the state system’s approach to teaching psychology, as the state psychology discipline chair of the Colorado Community College System from 2002 to 2010. One of her many professional interests is research on the impact of student persistence in higher education.


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Ingrid Johnsrude

Ingrid Johnsrude is Professor of Psychology at the University of Western Ontario where she is also the Research Chair at the Brain and Mind Institute and School of Communication Sciences and Disorders. Ingrid ‘s principal area of research is the cognitive neuroscience of communication and hearing. Her experimental work, relying on both behavioural and functional imaging methods, concerns the cognitive processes that transform speech from sound into meaning. She has won awards for her work, including the EWR Steacie fellowship from NSERC, and her papers have been cited more than 7000 times.


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Displaying 46-60 of 110